San Diego Plug-in EV Adoption Program

The city with the most electric vehicles (EVs) per capita with 1,000 charging stations (Plug-in EV Adoption Program)

San Diego, CA

Gasoline vs. electric car

Gasoline vs. electric car

How you can benefit

Using an electric car can cost you less and pollute less than gasoline cars.

Why IT's a leading policy

San Diego won a 2012 Governor's Environmental and Economic Leadership Award for Plug-in EV Readiness and for:

Goal

To reduce San Diego’s polluting gasoline consumption by 50% by 2020 and 90% by 2035.

Who can take action

The nonprofit Center for Sustainable Energy helps create electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS) by working with:

  • Local governments on permitting and inspection
  • Employers on incentives and policies
  • Contractors on permitting and installation and market development
  • Large building owners on siting and connection costs
  • Car dealerships on incentives

Outcome

San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) helped install 1,500 public and commercial, and 1,000 home PEV charging stations in the county.

contact

Jackques Chirazi, JChirazi@sandiego.gov

last updated

December 20, 2015

Santa Monica Transportation Impact Fee Ordinance

Fee to developers to make it easier for you to ride public transit, bike and walk (Transportation Impact Fee Ordinance)

Santa Monica, CA

St. Patrick's Day green bike lanes

St. Patrick's Day green bike lanes

How IT can benefit you

Santa Monica has about 89,000 residents, but has 500,000 to 1 million visitors on weekends and holidays.

So in 2013, the city created the Transportation Impact Fee to developers if their proposed land use would increase the amount of vehicle trips. $50-60 million generated by the fee would offset some of the $134 million the city expected to pay to build transportation infrastructure.

The fee would help pay for new sidewalks, crosswalks, traffic signal upgrades, transit, and bicycle sharing programs and trails.

Medical office developments would pay the highest fees. Lodging projects would pay $3.60 per square foot, while industrial developments would pay around $1.20 per square foot. The amount assessed depends upon which area a project is located.

Why it's a leading policy

It renamed “alternative transportation” to "active transit" to normalize biking, walking and public transit.

Goal

To reduce a net of 59,500 car trips in peak hours.

Who can take action

Developers

Contact

David Martin, Director, Planning & Community Development, (310) 458-8341, planning@smgov.net

Last Updated

December 20, 2015

SF Commuter Benefits Ordinance

Save up to 30% to ride public transit or vanpools, or bike to work (Commuter Benefits Ordinance)

San Francisco

Image by Wage Works.

Image by Wage Works.

How you can benefit

It costs you about $9,000 a year to own a car.  Also vehicles using fossil fuels (like gas and diesel) cause air pollution. That causes three million premature deaths a yearasthma, heart attacks and premature births.  When you take public transit, you can benefit from an average of 19 minutes of exercise a day walking or biking to and from transit stops. 

If you work in San Francisco for a business or nonprofit with 20 or more employees nationwide, your employer is required to give you Commuter Benefits so you can save up to 30% by taking public transit or vanpools to work.  Employers can save up to 9% on payroll taxes per employee.

"Employees who have options to their commute beyond driving alone tend to be more productive in their work and have an overall higher level of job satisfaction, which is good for business. It doesn't add any extra burden on the employer."

-James Paxson, Hacienda Business Park

See this calculator or short video on how much money you can save.

Why this is a leading policy

This Commuter Benefits Ordinance was the first in the Bay Area and it led to the creation of the 2014 Bay Area Commuter Benefits Ordinance.

Goal

To help businesses and employees save money while decreasing traffic and improving air quality.

Who can take action

Any business based in San Francisco with 20 or more employees nationwide.

Outcome

In 2013, over 4,200 San Francisco organizations participated in the Commuter Benefits Program, reducing 290,000 metric tons of polluting greenhouse gas emissions in one year.

Public Outreach and Education

San Francisco Department of the Environment reminds businesses via mail, email and social media.

contact

CommuteSmart, San Francisco Department of the Environment, (415) 355-3727, CommuteSmart@sfgov.org.

last updated

July 14, 2015
 

SF Bay Area Bike Share

Rent and return a bike to a different or same city (Bay Area Bike Share)

San Francisco Bay Area, CA

how it can benefit you

It costs you about $9,000 a year to own a car.  Also vehicles using fossil fuels like gas and diesel cause air pollution. That causes three million premature deaths a yearasthma, heart attacks and premature births

If you want your own bike, you have to buy and maintain it.  San Francisco Bay Area cities eliminated those barriers to make it easier for you to bike.

why it's a leading program

The Bay Area Bike Share is the first large-scale bike sharing system on the West Coast of the U.S. Unlike other existing bike share programs, it is the only one where you can rent and return bikes to non-adjacent cities.

goal

To provide affordable and convenient access to bikes.

who can take action

The program is partnership between local government agencies: Air District, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, Sam-Trans, Caltrain, the County of San Mateo, the San Mateo County Transportation Authority, the City of Redwood City and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority.

budget to coordinate the program

The pilot cost about $7 million and received $1.4 million from the Air District, $1.3 million from local agency partners and $4.29 million from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission.

contact

Kansas Waugh, Manager, Bay Area Bike Share System

last updated

July 14, 2015